How to mount and adjust your scope for shooting and hunting

With the boom in online armories and peer-to-peer opportunities, many people choose to adjust their rifle scope for deer hunting without going through a gunsmith. It is above all to have the pleasure of mounting your glasses yourself but also to save between $30 and $50. We will see in this article that fitting and adjusting your bezel is a very simple thing if you follow several steps.

Preparation of parts before assembly

The first important step is to create a slight roughness in the inner part of the mounting rings. This roughness will prevent the scope body from advancing through the rings due to recoil and causing you to lose your scope setting. Indeed, even a tightly tightened bezel can end up moving because of its smooth tube. Be careful, however, to use a fine sandpaper, you should not dig the metal but simply replace the smooth surface with a slightly abraded surface. To make your equipment last over time, we advise you to obtain steel rings and not aluminum, which are softer, which risk being damaged at the level of the fixing on the rail / base in the event of disassembly / reassembly.

It is preferable to obtain rings equipped with a stop bar. Indeed some low-end rings are not provided and we strongly advise against them. Without stopper plate, the rings advance along the rail thus losing the adjustment of the rifle scope. We use Warne brand steel rings on ATC . These are some of the cheapest steel rings you can find, they are simple and reliable. ( Warne “low” diameter 25mm / 1inch and standard version diameter 2.5cm / 1inch . For glasses with 30mm body there are also the low and standard versions ).

Depending on the weapons you will either have an original welded rail / base, or a blank weapon where you will have to attach a rail / base. Most of the time you will need to procure and secure your rail / base. Again, we insist on getting steel material, not aluminum material. The rail or the base are also not spared by the recoil of the weapon and it happens regularly that they end up loosening of the rifle. A simple trick is to place a drop of epoxy resin on the head of the screws after tightening to prevent them from unscrewing over the shots. If you subsequently wish to dismantle your rail or base, all you need to do is pass acetone with a brush on the glue to dissolve it.

The mounting of the rings on the rail or the base

Assembly of the lower part of the rings

Your rings abraded and your rail / base fixed, you still have to assemble the lower part of your rings. Here it is important to correctly place the rings on the rail or the base so that the stop located under the rings abuts in the front part of the notch of the rail or the base. Once again you can add a point of epoxy glue on the side fixing screws of the rings (green point on the image on the right).

The red part of the ring must come into abutment with the red parts of the rail or the base in order to avoid any displacement due to the recoil of the rifle.

Some prefer to abrade the inner part of the rings at this stage using a kit provided for this purpose. This kit consists of a steel cylinder with a diameter very slightly greater than that of the rings and an abrasive paste. The operation consists of coating the cylinder with the paste and making it play in the rings that will have been tightened beforehand around the cylinder. The repeated action of the passage of the cylinder in the rings will create a clean abrasive to the alignment of your rings on your rail / base.

This practice is absolutely not essential and many gunsmiths do without it. Indeed, the manufacture and cutting of rings, rails and bases is done today using lasers and other precision machines. If you put the price in quality material, the alignment of your rings and your rail / base will be done without any problem, you will just have to abrade your rings using a simple fine sandpaper like us detailed it in the first step.

Place your bezel on the lower part of the rings, screw the upper part very slightly so as to hold the bezel while being able to move it in the rings to adjust it.

The first step here is to adjust the distance of the scope from your eye in the firing position. To know if your glasses are at a good distance from your eye, nothing could be simpler! Your telescope is at a good distance from your eye when, in the firing position, you obtain a clear image over the entire diameter of the field of view and no shadow distorts the periphery of the image.

Eye-relief
Comparison of sharp image (left and right) and blurred image with distorted and irregular edges (center)

Once the correct distance between the telescope and your eye has been found, take a spirit level and place it on the elevation turret. As soon as you have found the correct horizontal adjustment of your telescope using the level, do not touch anything and start tightening the rings. Be careful here to apply a progressive tightening of each screw so as not to create an imbalance, tighten each screw a quarter or a half turn at each thread.

For my part, I usually draw a line with the marker on the body of the bezel and against the front part of one of the rings. This allows me to see from the first setting shots if my scope has not moved in the rings.

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Spirit level on elevation turret and red indicator line on the body of the telescope

Tuning at the shooting range

Even if you are a hunter and do not shoot much, it is still important to be a member of a shooting club or at least to be able to practice from time to time. Try to get to the shooting range on a low traffic day as you will have to walk around the range several times. We also advise you to get a spotting scope, no need to invest in too high-end since shooting over 300m is prohibited for hunting and the stands where you can shoot over 300m are also available. rare. If you don’t want to buy a spotting scope, you can also get some reactive fluorescent paper targets, but you will have a hard time distinguishing your impacts beyond 100m if your telescope has a magnification less than 10. When you are at your firing station, position your rifle so that it is holding the target on its own. To do this, place it either on a “bench rest” type shooting support, or use a bipods or even a backpack and place a support under the stick in addition. The goal is to be able to look through the barrel from the rear of the rifle (after removing the breech lever) and to orient it on the target that you will have placed at 25m. There are also lasers to be placed in the barrel to carry out the first adjustment at 50m but given the prices of these devices, they are not really interesting since the classic technique works just as well. If, however, you are using a semi-automatic rifle, it is likely that you will need a either use a bipod or even a backpack and place a support under the butt in addition. The goal is to be able to look through the barrel from the rear of the rifle (after removing the breech lever) and to orient it on the target that you will have placed at 25m. There are also lasers to be placed in the barrel to carry out the first adjustment at 50m but given the prices of these devices, they are not really interesting since the classic technique works just as well. If, however, you are using a semi-automatic rifle, it is likely that you will need a either use a bipod or even a backpack and place a support under the butt in addition. The goal is to be able to look through the barrel from the rear of the rifle (after removing the breech lever) and to orient it on the target that you will have placed at 25m. There are also lasers to be placed in the barrel to carry out the first adjustment at 50m but given the prices of these devices, they are not really interesting since the classic technique works just as well. If, however, you are using a semi-automatic rifle, it is likely that you will need a There are also lasers to be placed in the barrel to carry out the first adjustment at 50m but given the prices of these devices, they are not really interesting since the classic technique works just as well. If, however, you are using a semi-automatic rifle, it is likely that you will need a There are also lasers to be placed in the barrel to carry out the first adjustment at 50m but given the prices of these devices, they are not really interesting since the classic technique works just as well. If, however, you are using a semi-automatic rifle, it is likely that you will need aiming laser since alignment of the gun to the eye target is not possible.

Rear view of the rifle placed on a stable support, the barrel is in line with the target

When you have aligned the barrel on the target, leave your rifle in this position without moving it and adjust your scope so that it aims at the center of the target.

Raise your breech lever and place yourself in the firing position, perform a first series of three shots, adjust your scope, confirm your setting with several other shots then place your target at 50M. Repeat the operation and do the same at 100m.

As a reminder:
at 25m 1MOA = 0.75cm, at 50m 1MOA = 1.45cm, at 100m 1MOA = 2.9 cm, if your turrets are in quarter MOA and you need to correct 10cm at 100m, then perform 14 clicks. (14 x 0.725 = 10.15 cm)
at 25m 1MRAD = 2.5cm, at 50m 1MRAD = 5 cm, at 100m 1MRAD = 10 cm, if your turrets are in tenth of MRAD and you need to correct 10 cm at 100m, then make 10 clicks. (10x 1 = 10cm)

Be careful not to confuse the value of an MOA and an MRAD at distances in yards, 1MAO at 100 yards corresponds to 2.5cm.

There is a simple mnemonic trick so as not to make a mistake in setting your glasses. Imagine a nut in place of your elevation turret. If you screw in the nut to tighten, then the nut goes down. Conversely if you unscrew your nut, it goes up. It is exactly the same with your turret, if you screw as if to tighten then your point of impact on target will go down, if you unscrew your point of impact on target will go up.

Many people find it difficult to imagine the inner workings of the riflescopes, it is for this reason that the manufacturers have added the words UP and DOWN on the turrets, these words simplify their use because they mean going up or down the point impact on the target and not the reticle itself. In fact, when the elevation turret is turned down, the point of impact goes down because the reticle has raised it.

You have learned to assemble your telescope alone, to adjust it and even to use it beyond 100m! A good shooter must be independent and know both his weapon but also his equipment, in particular his scope.